Michele Guinness is a writer and a regular broadcaster and speaker.

She is a Jewish convert to Christianity and is married to an Anglican priest, Peter Guinness.


Brought up in a practising Jewish family, and married to a retired Church of England minister, Michele worked in the UK media for many years. Her last job was as Head of Communications for the National Health Service in Cumbria and Lancashire. She retired to concentrate on writing and speaking and regularly contributes to local radio, and a number of magazines.

She has also written thirteen books. Her only novel, Archbishop, a thriller, is now out in paperback. Set in 2024 Archbishop tells the story of Vicky Burnham-Woods, the UK’s first female Archbishop of Canterbury. Her latest book, Grace, The Remarkable Life of Grace Grattan Guinness published in February 2016, tells the story of her husband’s grandmother through her diaries, journals and letter. Read More »


Peter’s retirement has meant the fulfilment of a lifelong ambition – to spend a great deal more time in France. Her book, Autumn Leave, was a diary of a three month sabbatical in 2006, spent setting up a new home there.

Many people asked for a sequel. Here it is in the form of a blog or spiritual journal, where Michele explores life torn between two cultures, managing five acres and the French, grandparenting, revamping a marriage with a man about the house all day, loves and losses, creaking joints, and moving slowly but inexorably from autumn towards winter. Read More »


Over the years Michele has written a number of books, looking at life from her uniquely Jewish perspective, with a large dollop of Jewish humour.

Her well-received debut novel, Archbishop became available in paperback in 2015.

Grace, newly published in February 2016 is the remarkable story of her husband Peter's grandmother - a remarkable woman, a rebel against the confines of her strict but loving Brethren childhood, a young widow of a famous preacher forty years her senior, a single mother who worked to feed her two boys and was also a wry, witty, and entertaining commentator on her times. Read More »